Success Regime announces public meeting dates

The West, North and East Cumbria Success Regime has announced a series of public meetings to engage local communities in discussions about the future of healthcare services in the county.

Events will take place across West, North and East Cumbria in April and May in the districts of Allerdale, Carlisle, Copeland and Eden to enable the public to have their say on how the local health system can tackle some of the difficult issues it faces.   

The dates, times and venues for the meetings are:

  • Tuesday 19th April 1pm-3pm: Main Hall, Longtown Community Centre, Arthuret Road, Longtown
  • Tuesday 19th April 6:30pm-8:30pm: Tithe Barn, St. Cuthbert’s Church Centre, West Walls, Carlisle
  • Monday 25th April 1pm-3pm: Penrith Parish Centre, St Andrew’s Place, Penrith
  • Monday 25th April 6:30pm-8:30pm: Masonic Hall, 39 Market Street, Kirkby Stephen
  • Wednesday 4th May 1pm-2:30pm: Guide Hall, St. George's Rd, Millom
  • Wednesday 4th May 7pm-9pm: Solway Hall (Whitehaven Civic Hall), 75 Lowther St, Whitehaven
  • Thursday 5th May 12:30pm-2:30pm: Function Room, Skiddaw Hotel, Main Street, Keswick
  • Thursday 5th May 6:30pm-8:30pm: Maryport Rugby Club, Mealpot Road, Maryport

The events will see presentations from clinicians and health service leaders on the Success Regime’s latest emerging thinking, before giving the public a chance to ask questions and also contribute their own alternative options for the way health and care services should be run in future.

Sir Neil McKay, the chair of the West, North and East Cumbria Success Regime programme board, said: “These public meetings are part of our engagement programme to ensure we give the public an opportunity to tell us, face-to-face, what they think of our emerging thinking and to contribute their own thoughts and ideas on how we can create an improved and sustainable health service in Cumbria.”

The programme of engagement also includes a Healthwatch vehicle visiting communities across Cumbria – including some of the most remote communities – to have conversations with members of the public on the future of healthcare in this area.

Last month the Success Regime released a Progress Report which unveiled its emerging vision to help the area become an international centre of excellence for integrated health and social care provision in rural, remote and dispersed communities. 

It detailed the development of a number of initiatives including a helicopter-based Emergency Medical Retrieval Service, much greater use of tele-medicine and the development of a number of GP-based Integrated Care Communities designed to provide coordinated care, more out-of-hospital care and to ensure a greater focus on self-care.

Sir Neil added: “Through the various meetings, conversations and feedback we have received online via social media and through our website, we are already hearing a broad spectrum of opinion on how services should be run in the future, as well as gaining a sense of the passion people have for the NHS in Cumbria.

“It is fantastic to see this passion, and we encourage people to continue to have their say on how they feel we can solve some of the difficult issues faced by the local health system in Cumbria. The answers are not straightforward or simple, and because of that we welcome any and all opinions on how we can tackle these problems.”

The Success Regime was established in part because the local health system has failed to achieve the key waiting time requirements in A&E, cancer and diagnostics and following a Care Quality Commission report which rated North Cumbria Acute Hospitals Trust (NCUHT) as ‘requires improvement’, with general medical services in West Cumberland Hospital rated ‘inadequate’. The CQC has indicated that NCUHT should remain in special measures until its future is satisfactorily resolved.